Automotive and Tech Perspectives: Tesla Cybertruck First Drive Videos

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The first drive reviews of the Tesla Cybertruck are rolling out. These are final prototype drives, which happened just before the first customer deliveries happened in Texas on November 30, 2023.

While there are a handful of videos out there with actual drives of the truck, the two below have the most interesting info that you won’t be able to discern from the press release or the first delivery event.

Let’s dive in.

Jason Cammisa’s Cybertruck ICONS Video

Jason Cammisa is a super-seasoned automotive journalist who tends to speak his mind and go deep into the details and history of vehicles. I’ve respected his observations and opinions — even if I don’t always agree with them — for a long time now. His Icon series of videos is always good, at least if you’re a car nerd like me.

I’m not going to tell you everything from the video, as you really should watch it. But, here’s the summary. The Cybertruck is super safe, has very impressive new battery tech, has very durable body panels, is the first-ever steer-by-wire production consumer vehicle, and is impressively lightweight for what it is. Also, it’s fast. Like, really fast!

The Cyberbeast model of the Cybertuck is what is shown in the video. It is a three-motor AWD version that costs about $100,000. Starting pricing was announced at about $40,000 in 2019. But the starting price for the 2WD base truck is about $60,000 today.

One of Cammisa’s conclusions for the Cybertruck is, “It’s an insult to judge it by how it looks.” Based on his findings, I’d have to agree.

Marques Brownlee Cybertruck: Everything You Need to Know Video

Marques Brownlee is a very respected tech reviewer. The Cybertruck is a technological marvel. Brownlee’s first drive impressions video about the Cybertruck reveals lots of little quirkiness that Tesla hasn’t shown yet.

The Cybertruck is about 5% smaller than the truck shown in 2019, but still bigger than most predicted. Brownlee measured it at about 224 inches long and says the overall dimensions are very similar to the F-150 Lightning.

The Cybertruck rolls on 20-inch wheels. Those wheels have a two-piece plastic aero cap on them for efficiency. They pop off like a hub cap, which you’d want to do if you take the truck off-road, or want to lose a tiny bit of the post-apocalypse look of the truck.

There is no spare tire on the Cyberbeast version of the Cybertruck, but apparently one is available to order. But, it would need to live in the truck bed and take up cargo room, as there is no specific mounting place for it. Not optimal for off-road adventures where having a spare is pretty critical.

There are no exterior door handles at all. There is a small button on the B-pillar and C-pillar that power pops the door ajar. Then you have to grab the edge of the door to open it. All good unless there is lots of ice built up on the car. Oh, and your fingerprints will for sure be all over the door where you grab it to open it.

The side view mirrors are removable — not sure why — and the truck will “maybe” come with an interior rearview mirror. There are lots of cameras to handle the visibility concerns, however. The world’s largest windshield wiper and windshield helps with the visibility as well. And, the very usable sun visors should help keep sun glare down. And, they have cool magnetic holders.

Inside the truck are two wireless chargers in the center console. And oddly, the hazards and gear selector “buttons” are on the roof-mounted console, where the rearview mirror usually lives.

The frunk is tiny on the Cybertruck. Specifically, it is shallow, but just large enough to carry two airline carry-on suitcases. It is also powered and can open itself at the touch of a button.

The tailgate is not powered, but it does have a damped drop. The powered tonneau cover, controlled by a button on top of the truck bedside, can hold 300 pounds — not sure why it needs to hold weight on top, though. The rear window in the truck has a shield on it that raises when the cover is closed, presumably to protect the glass from cargo in the truck bed. Also in the truck bed is a bottle cap opener.

There are Cybertruck logos throughout the truck, but very little Tesla branding on the truck. No Tesla branding on the outside of the truck at all. I don’t think anyone would mistake the Cybertruck for anything else, however.

One impression from the driver’s seat that Brownlee points out: “I’m thinking about the visibility over the nose of this car. Man, it’s not great.”


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